We proudly provide instruction in the following styles 

Taekwondo Han Moo Kwan

Han Moo Kwan was founded on August 1954 by Kyo Yoon Lee and is one of the nine original Kwans that later formed Kukkiwon Taekwondo. Lee was a student at the Chosun Yun Moo Kwan Kwon Bop Bu (sometimes spelled "Yun Mu Kwan" in English transliteration), learning from its founder, Sang Sup Chun. Later, after the Korean War Armistice Agreementwas signed in 1953, Lee started teaching the returning Yun Moo Kwan Kwon Bop Bu members at the Hankuk Chaeyuk Kwan Dojang. Kyo Yoon Lee continues to be active in the Kukkiwon and serves on the High Dan/Poom Black Belt promotion committee of the Kukkiwon.The official training curriculum endorsed by Taekwondo Han Moo Kwan is the Kukkiwon curriculum. The current President of Taekwondo Han Moo Kwan remains its founder, Kyo Yoon Lee. Han Moo Kwan supports the World Taekwondo Federation and Kukkiwon.

​​Taekwondo Chang Moo Kwan
Chang Moo Kwan is a Korean martial arts group was founded by Lee Nam Suk and Kim Soon Bae. At the end of World War II, several Kwans were set up. In the late 1950s, these Kwans united under the name Tae Soo Do. A few years later, the name Taekwondo was adopted for its similarity in name, to Taekkyon (practiced by the Goguryeo, Silla, Baekjae, and Goryeo Dynasties). Lee Nam Suk's teacher Byung In Yoon had founded the "YMCA Kwon Bop Bu" (권법무) in 1946. Byung In Yoon had studied Chinese Kung Fu (ch'uan-fa) under the guidance of a Mongolian instructor in Manchuria. Today, the official Taekwondo Chang Moo Kwan still exists in Korea as a fraternal friendship club with its office in a youth athletic club in Seoul. The current president of Chang Moo Kwan is Kim Soon Bae. Kim is also on the Kukkiwon Dan Promotion Committee. The official martial arts curriculum of Chang Moo Kwan is the Kukkiwon system. Chang Moo Kwan, like all of the main Kwans, supports the Kukkiwon and the WTF.

Hapkido is a form of self-defense that employs joint locks, grappling and throwing techniques of other martial arts, as well as kicks, punches, and other striking attacks. There is also the use of traditional weapons, including knife, sword, rope, jool bong (nunchaku), cane, short stick (dan bong), and middle-length staff (joongbong, gun, bō (Japanese)) which vary in emphasis depending on the particular tradition examined. Hapkido contains both long- and close-range fighting techniques, utilizing jumping kicks and percussive hand strikes at longer ranges and pressure point strikes, joint locks, or throws at closer fighting distances. Hapkido emphasizes circular motion, redirection of force, and control of the opponent. Practitioners seek to gain advantage through footwork and body positioning to incorporate the use of leverage, avoiding the use of strength against strength.

Gumdo translates as the Korean art of the sword. It is a martial art practiced with one or two swords, and it's inspired by ancient and modern Korean sword-fighting styles. While learning to use a sword in a safe way, this sport consists mostly of individual training without the hits and kicks traditionally associated with martial arts, although in Gumdo also do pair techniques. Gumdo can be practiced for competition or to pursue personal well-being - in all cases you’ll be rewarded with visible progress.


 Judo (柔道 jūdō, meaning "gentle way") was created as a physical, mental and moral pedagogy in Japan, in 1882, by Jigoro Kano (嘉納治五郎). It is generally categorized as a modern martial art which later evolved into a combat and Olympic sport. Its most prominent feature is its competitive element, where the objective is to either throw or takedown an opponent to the ground, immobilize or otherwise subdue an opponent with a pin, or force an opponent to submit with a joint lock or a choke. Strikes and thrusts by hands and feet as well as weapons defenses are a part of judo, but only in pre-arranged forms (kata, 形) and are not allowed in judo competition or free practice (randori, 乱取り). A judo practitioner is called a judoka.